#1

Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 10:57 am
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

H2O2---aka---hydrogen peroxide

there's not a whole lot said about this miracle in a bottle good for cleaning, killing fungus gnats, killing spider mites, killing bacteria, killing mold, taking chlorine from city water, and bringing oxygen directly to your roots for a healthy plant---i'ts easiest for me to just copy and paste what i have read---in addition---the purpose of this thread is for informational purposes only---if you care to share your experiences with this stuff---that would be cool so we all benefit by growing bigger bader healthier dank---i been experimenting with 34% food grade HP @ 4l HP : 1 Gal tap water


Last edited Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:11 am | Scroll up

#2

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 10:58 am
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

Hydrogen Peroxide and Horticulture
By Bryce Fredrickson
Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is a clear sharp smelling substance very similar in appearance to water (H2O). Like water it is made up of Hydrogen and Oxygen, however H2O2 has an extra Oxygen atom in an unstable arrangement. It is this extra atom that gives H2O2 its useful properties. H2O2 has been used for many purposes including cleaning, bleaching, sterilizing, rocket fuel, animal feed treatment and in addition many miraculous claims about its health benefits have been made. This article isn't about any of these; instead it will concentrate on horticultural applications. H2O2 is of great use for both hydroponics and dirt/soilless gardening.

1. What Does Hydrogen Peroxide do?
H2O2 is an unstable molecule, when it breaks down a single oxygen atom and a molecule of water is released. This oxygen atom is extremely reactive and will attach itself to either another O- atom forming a stable Oxygen molecule or attack a nearby organic molecule. Both the stable and O- forms will increase the level of dissolved oxygen. This is the method by which H2O2 is beneficial. Pretreating the water supply with H2O2 will drive out the Chlorine many cities use to sterilize it. This will also degrade any pesticides or herbicides that might be present as well as any other organic matter. Well water can be high in methane and organic sulfates, both of which H2O2 will remove. Many disease causing organisms and spores are killed by Oxygen, the free Oxygen H2O2 releases is extremely effective at this. H2O2 will help eliminate existing infections and will help prevent future ones. It is also useful for suppressing algae growth. The free Oxygen atom will destroy dead organic material (i.e, leaves roots) in the system preventing them from rotting and spreading diseases.

2.Over Watering
Roots require Oxygen to breathe and low levels are the main cause of almost all root diseases. Both soil and hydroponic plants often fall prey to the same syndrome although it is rarely recognized as what it really is. Hydroponic crops often fail due to "root rot" and soil crops succumb to "over watering." The real cause of both these problems is a shortage of Oxygen at the root zone. In a soil system the soil consists of particles, a film of water on the particles and air spaces between the particles. When too much water is put into the soil the air spaces fill with liquid. The roots will quickly use up what Oxygen is dissolved in the water, if they haven't drunk enough of the liquid to allow air back in to the soil spaces they will stop working. In this situation roots will start dying within twenty-four hours. As the roots die the plants ability to drink water and nutrients will decrease, this will cause symptoms of nutrient deficiencies (mostly pale, slow, weak growth), and strangely they will start to wilt like they don't have enough water. It is easy to make a fatal mistake at this point and add more water.

In a Hydroponic system the cause is a more direct simple lack of oxygen in the solution, this may be from inadequate circulation and/or aeration. High reservoir temperatures also interfere with Oxygen's ability to dissolve in the water. Temperatures above 70F (20C) will eventually cause problems, 62F-65F (16C-18C) is recommended. The same symptoms will appear as with soil plants but you can also check the roots. Healthy roots should be mostly white with maybe a slight yellowish tan tinge. If they are a brownish colour with dead tips or they easily pull away there is at least the beginnings of a serious problem. An organic dirtlike rotting smell means there is already a very good chance it is too late. As roots die and rot they eat Oxygen out of the water, as Oxygen levels are even further depleted more roots die, a viscius circle may be well under way. Reduced Oxygen levels and high temperatures both encourage anaerobic bacteria and fungi. The plants may still be saved but you will have to work fast.

3. How Hydrogen Peroxide prevents root rot/overwatering.
When plants are watered with H2O2 it will break down and release Oxygen into the area around the roots. This helps stop the Oxygen from being depleted in the water filled air spaces until air can get back into them. High Oxygen levels at the roots will encourage rapid healthy root growth. In a Hydroponic system H2O2 will disperse through out the system and raise Oxygen levels as it breaks down. Strong white healthy roots with lots of fuzzy new growth will be visible. This fuzzy growth has massive surface area allowing for rapid absorption of the huge amounts of water and nutrients needed for rapid top growth. A healthy plant starts with a healthy root system.

4. How to use it.
H2O2 comes in several different strengths 3%, 5%, 8% and 35%, also sold as food grade Hydrogen Peroxide. The most economical is 35% which we recommend be diluted to three percent before using, as at this high concentration it can cause damage to skin and clothing. When working with food grade H2O2 it is very important that you clean up any spills or splashes immediately, it will damage almost anything very quickly. This is extra important with skin and clothing. Skin will be temporarily bleached pure white if not washed cleaned. Gloves are strongly recommended when working with any strong chemical.

Food grade H2O2 can be diluted to three percent by mixing it one part to eleven parts water (preferably distilled). The storage container should be opaque to prevent light from getting in and it must be able to hold some pressure. If three-liter pop bottles are available in your area they are ideal for mixing and storing H2O2. There are twelve quarter liters (250ml) in three liters, if you put in one quarter liter H2O2 and eleven quarter liters (250ml) water in the bottle it will full of three percent H2O2 and the bottle can hold the pressure that the H2O2 will generate. Three percent Hydrogen Peroxide may be added at up to three ml's per liter (2 1\2 tsp. Per gallon), but it is recommended that you start at a lower concentration and increase to full strength over a few weeks. Use every watering even on fresh cuttings. For hydroponics use every reservoir change and replace twenty-five percent (one quarter) every day. Example: In a 100L reservoir you would add three hundred ml's (3%) H2O2 when changing the nutrient. You would then add seventy-five ml's more every day.

5. Where to get it.
35% food grade: called food grade because it has no toxic impurities
Of course your local hydroponics retailer, whom you can locate over the web at www.hydromall.com. Direct order off the web (there may be shipping restrictions on high strength peroxides). H2O2 is used to bleach hair so the local hairdresser may have a source. The local feed supplier may have it in small towns. Prices range from fifteen dollars per quarter liter to eighty dollars a gallon. One gallon will treat up to fifty thousand liters of water.

3%5%, 8%
Can be found at most drugstores or pharmacies, prices start at a less than a dollar for a one hundred-ml bottle that will treat one hundred liters.

6. What to do if you already have root rot.

In Dirt:
Use peroxided water with anti-fungicide (benomyl) and a high Phosphate fertilizer (9-45-15, 10-52-10, 0-60-0) for root growth. Root booster (5-15-5) or any other product with rooting hormone dissolved in it is helpful in regrowing roots and is strongly recommended. If a plant is wilty adding Nutri-Boost may save it. Water heavily until liquid pours out the bottom of the pot. This sound like bad idea, but it flushes out stagnant dead water and replaces it with fresh highly oxygenated water. Don't let plants sit in trays full of water, the soil will absorb this water and stay too wet. Don't water again until the pot feels light and the top inch or two of the soil are dry.

In Hydro:
Change your nutrients. Add H2O2 to the system. This will add oxygen and chemically eat dead roots. If roots are badly rotted and can be pulled away by hand you should pull them off. They are already dead and will only rot, causing further problems. Add a fungicide to kill any fungus that is probably present in the rotted tissue to prevent it from spreading. Root booster will speed recovery. If plants are wilty Nutri-Boost may help save them. Increase aeration of the water, get an airpump and air stones, or more of them, for the reservoir. An air stone under every plant is usually very effective, but will require a larger air pump. Models that will do from forty to four hundred stones are available. Decrease the reservoir temperature, oxygen dissolves better in cold water and disease causing organisms reproduce slower as well. A good temperate range is 62F to 65F; anything above 70F will eventually cause a problem. It is also a good idea to remove any wilty plants from the system and put them on a separate reservoir so they don't infect plants that are still healthy.

Summary
The key to big productive plants is a big healthy root system and Hydrogen Peroxide is a great way to keep your roots healthy. It is a must to ensure the biggest best crops possible and to increase the chances of your plants thriving to harvest. Peroxide users will rarely lose plants or crops to root disease and will harvest larger and more consistent crops.

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#3

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:00 am
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

Ways to use Hydrogen Peroxide in the Garden

The benefits of hydrogen peroxide for a garden can be useful for any kind of a garden, and any method of gardening. Peroxide is great for plants that are planted in the ground, and it’s also great for plants in containers -- it is useful in hydroponic gardens, raised beds, and greenhouses.

Similarly, peroxide for gardening applies well with all kinds of plants: a rose garden, herb garden, vegetable garden, orchard, shade trees, flower garden or lawn -- any or all of these would benefit from hydrogen peroxide.

Peroxide works by releasing oxygen. It acts as an oxygen supplement for plants. It seems to really support both good health and strong growth for plants.

Hydrogen peroxide can also help with soil fungus: it aerates the soil, and it is anti-fungal. (It is also anti-bacterial.)



Ways to use peroxide in the garden

General fertilizer, either in plant water or sprayed on foliage. This page has much more detail about how to mix and apply peroxide in the garden.

For sick plants. Spray on the leaves and add to water.

Hydroponic gardening. Hydroponic gardeners often use peroxide to feed plants, by adding it to the watering system.

Spray on tree cuts, to prevent infection.

As a spray in the greenhouse, to control mold and mildew

Sprouting seeds before planting. Added to the water that seeds soak in, the seeds will sprout faster and grow stronger.

Rooting cuttings. Added to the water, if you’ve put the cuttings directly into water. Or, if you’ve put the cuttings into soil or medium, use peroxide in the water you’re using to water the cuttings with.

Mold or fungus on plants or in the soil. Hydrogen peroxide will help to control mold on plants or in the soil. If you’ve got mold on the plant, spraying the leaves is probably best…

Weed killer. I’ve never used it this way, and I’m not sure I would want to… but I’ve read that 10% hydrogen peroxide will kill weeds. Personally, I would rather pull the weeds up. If you do decide to try this, I certainly would NOT use 10% peroxide close to other plants… and I would come back later and add a LOT of water after the unwanted plants ("weeds") have died. This is very very very concentrated……


How much peroxide to use in the garden….
This page has charts showing the amount of hydrogen peroxide to use for watering and spraying plants, for general applications and for sick or fungsy plants. Please take a look – it only takes a little bit of peroxide.



Peroxide for sprouting seeds and rooting cuttings…
Here is a science fair project using hydrogen peroxide for sprouting seeds and rooting cuttings. In this experiment you have a choice of either sprouting seeds or rooting cuttings. Either way, different amounts of hydrogen peroxide are used, and the results then compared.



Hydrogen peroxide in earth’s natural watering system (rain)
When the garden is watered by rain, there is a small amount of hydrogen peroxide in the water. It is part of the earth’s cleaning system.....

As rain comes through earth’s ozone layer, some of the molecules of water (H2O) pick up an additional oxygen atom (O), becoming H2O2 – hydrogen peroxide!

Oxygen is O2, while ozone is O3. Ozone is very unstable -that third oxygen atom moves on easily. So the water has no trouble picking up some single oxygen atoms.

Hydrogen peroxide is also very unstable -oxygen is readily freed up to oxidize various things that it encounters (such as bacteria, viruses, mold, pollution…) In the process of oxidation, the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is broken back down into water (H20) and oxygen (O).

Hydrogen peroxide will oxidize many kinds of pathogens and pollution, so it helps to clean the air, as the rain falls. I’ve read that there is currently less peroxide in rain water than was common in the past, since oxidizing air pollution now "uses up" much of the peroxide. (Hydrogen peroxide is always "used up" by the oxidation process.)

Now, I think that cleaning up some of the pollution in the air is a fine use for hydrogen peroxide, as the air after a rain is so much nicer to breathe. But our plants like peroxide too!


Last edited Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:23 am | Scroll up

#4

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:02 am
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

Hydrogen Peroxide as Soil Amendment Research

Submitted to: Proceedings of Horticultural Industry Show
Publication Type: Proceedings/Symposium
Publication Acceptance Date: February 8, 2007
Publication Date: May 1, 2007
Citation: Webber III, C.L., Sandtner, S.J., Webber, C.L. 2007. Hydrogen peroxide as a soil amendment for greenhouse nasturtium production (Tropaeolum majus L.). Proceedings of Horticultural Industry Show. 26:140-144.

Interpretive Summary: Hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, occurs naturally in animals and plants, and can help protect plants from diseases or signal the plant concerning stress. In addition to its use as a disinfectant for humans and in water purification, hydrogen peroxide is approved for the control of plant diseases. Hydrogen peroxide is used to control diseases on plant leaves, roots, and cuttings. The soil can also be treated with hydrogen peroxide before a plant is started in the soil. There are also common reports that hydrogen peroxide provides additional growth benefits beyond its ability to control diseases and help the plant deal with stress. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of soil applications of hydrogen peroxide solutions on plant growth and flowering. Container grown nasturtium seedlings cv. Scarlet Glean Improved were irrigated with either distilled water, tap water, or hydrogen peroxide solutions. The hydrogen peroxide treatments included adding 1.3, 13, or 26 teaspoons of hydrogen peroxide to a gallon of distilled water. Distilled water was used to be sure there wasn"t something else in the water that was helping or hurting the plants. Hydrogen peroxide applications did affect the nasturtium leaves, stems, roots, and flowers. Nasturtium leaves and stems, and the total plant (leaves, stems and roots) dry weight were greater when using 1.3 teaspoons/gallon than the 13 teaspoon/gallon. Twenty-six teaspoons/gallon resulted in more root growth than using 1.3 teaspoons/gallon. Flowering was also better when using 1.3 teaspoons/gallon than either 13 or 26 teaspoons/gallon. The results indicate that watering with 1.3 teaspoons of hydrogen peroxide/gallon of distilled water did provide growth and flowering benefits to nasturtiums grown in containers, although the results were not as great as the non-scientific reports would suggest. The difference between our results and what many people generally report may be the benefit of hydrogen peroxide decreasing or eliminating diseases in the soil containers rather than it directly helping the plant grow better.

Technical Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, is a highly reactive oxidizing agent naturally occurring in plants and animals. Plants produce hydrogen peroxide to destroy either infected plant cells or the pathogens within a plant. Hydrogen peroxide also acts as a stress signal to plants. It is approved for the control of microbial pests, fungi and bacterial that cause plant diseases and it is applied as a foliar spray, as a dip for cuttings and roots, and as a pre-planting soil treatment to prevent or control plant pathogens. There are also anecdotal reports that hydrogen peroxide provides additional growth benefits beyond its actions related to plant infection or plant stress. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of soil applications of hydrogen peroxide solutions on plant growth and flowering. Container grown nasturtium cv. Scarlet Glean Improved seedlings were irrigated with either distilled water, tap water, or hydrogen peroxide solutions. The hydrogen peroxide treatments included 0.005% H2O2 (1X), 0.05% H2O2 (10X), and 0.1% H2O2 (20X), which are equivalent to 1.3, 13, and 26 tsp/gallon of 3% hydrogen peroxide. The foliage and root fresh and dry weights harvested at 22 days after initiating treatment (DAIT) and the fresh weights at 33 DIAT were not significantly different as a result of the hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Hydrogen peroxide concentrations significantly impacted the foliage, root, and total dry weights at 33 DAIT. The 1X concentration of hydrogen peroxide produced significantly greater amounts of nasturtium foliage and total plant dry weights at 33 DAIT compared to the 10X concentration, but it was not significantly different from the distilled and tap water applications. The 20X root dry weights were significantly greater than all other treatments except the 1X hydrogen concentration. The 1X concentration produced significantly greater total number of flowers than either the 10X or 20X concentrations and 64 and 57% greater numbers of flowers than the distilled and tap water treatments. The results indicate that watering nasturtiums at the tested hydrogen peroxide applications rates did provide slight growth and flowering benefits to nasturtiums grown in containers, although the results were not as great as anecdotal reports would suggest. The most likely explanation for the anecdotal reports of dramatic growth stimulus of hydrogen peroxide watering solutions may be a result of hydrogen peroxide decreasing or eliminating diseases in the soil containers rather than it serving as a direct stimulus to the plant.

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#5

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:03 am
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

H2O2 has an extra O atom (compared to H2O) in an unstable arrangement. It's the extra atom that makes it useful in horticultural applications. Generally, we're not concerned with aerobic forms of bacteria normally occurring in container media or on roots.
Since H2O2 is an unstable molecule, it breaks down easily. When it does, a single O- atom and a molecule of water is released. This O- atom is extremely reactive and will quickly attach itself to either another O- atom forming stable O2, or attack the nearest organic molecule.
Many disease causing organisms and spores are killed by O. The free O- H2O2 releases is extremely effective at this. H2O2 can help eliminate existing infections and help prevent future ones. The free O atom can destroy dead organic material (i.e, leaves roots) that are rotting and spreading diseases.
Reduced O levels and high temperatures encourage both anaerobic bacteria and fungi. When plants growing in soil are treated with H2O2 it will break down and release O into the area around the roots. This helps stop the O from being depleted in the water filled air soil air spaces until air can get back into them. High O levels at the roots will encourage rapid healthy root growth and discourage unwanted bacteria/fungi.
.
I know it comes in several different strengths - 3%, 5%, 8% and 35% solutions. Cheapest is 35% which you dilute (to 3%) by mixing 1:11 with water. Plastic or glass is best to store it in, & the container should be opaque to prevent light degradation. If three-liter soda bottles are available in your area they are ideal for mixing and storing H2O2. Once you have it mixed at 3% (or start with 3%) mix it at the rate of 1-1/2 tsp/gallon of water as a cutting dip & up to 2-1/2 tsp/gallon to water containers with on a regular basis. Start at the lower concentration and increase concentrations gradually over a few weeks.
H2O2 in high concentration is a powerful oxidant and will bleach skin white as it quickly oxidizes almost anything it contacts, so be careful with it if you use it. A solution that's too strong can destroy any organic molecule it contacts.

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#6

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:06 am
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

Commonly associated with cleaning and personal care, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can also be used in a diluted mixture on plants without causing damage. Hydrogen peroxide has a variety of applications in gardening including seed germination, strengthening seedlings and preventing diseases. Mix regular 3 percent hydrogen peroxide with water in a solution at a rate of 2 1/2 teaspoons per gallon and use it to treat both indoor and outdoor plants.

Seed Sprouting
Soaking agricultural or ornamental seeds in a hydrogen peroxide solution will assist in destroying any potentially harmful pathogens on the outer coating before they can infect your plants. An H2O2 treatment of seeds also assists in breaking down their hard outer coating and allows for shorter germination times.

Seedling Care
To give flower, fruit or vegetable seedlings a boost, dip their roots or the ends of cuttings in a hydrogen peroxide mixture. Before putting plants in either pots or outdoors in the garden, treat the soil with the hydrogen peroxide mixture to help kill any potentially damaging bacteria and to prevent root rot.

Disease Control
At the first sign of bacteria or fungus, spray plants with a hydrogen peroxide solution, thoroughly wetting the foliage. The dissolved oxygen released by H2O2 will attack the microorganisms, helping to inhibit the spread of disease and encouraging strong, healthy roots to grow.

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#7

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:08 am
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

Enhances metabolism, protein development and overall growth
Safely rids growing mediums and nutrient solutions of harmful anaerobic bacteria
Helps maintain a healthy balance of dissolved Oxygen in nutrient reservoirs
Encourages germination and rooting of difficult to propagate plant species
Protects plants from the three most destructive disease causing pathogens


Add Liquid Life To Your Garden
H2O2 is used to safely raise the level of dissolved Oxygen in nutrient and fertilizer solutions to stimulate growth and control harmful pathogens including pythium, rhizoctonia and phytophthora, the three most destructive organisms in the garden.

Once diluted according to directions on opposite panel, H2O2 may be used as a foliar spray, watered into pots and planters or added to hydroponics reservoirs to immediately start performing its intended functions.

Hydrogen Peroxide is naturally found in rain and snow. It is formed when water is exposed to Ozone (O3) in the upper atmosphere. When H2O2 comes in contact with organic impurities, the extra Oxygen molecule is released and oxidizes the impurity, rendering it harmless. The original H2O2 molecule then returns to water. Our own immune system produces and uses Hydrogen Peroxide to control bacteria and viruses inside our bodies everyday.

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#8

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:10 am
by ozzydiodude • The Weird One | 2.468 Posts | 11514 Points

best way to get rid of slimy roots too
HYDROPONICS : Getting Rid Of Slimy Roots


Let's help each other, by spreading our knowledge of the plants we love

Cannabis grown with care grows into medicine somewhere!
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#9

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:13 am
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

growing organic in soil---i never flush and usually feed right up to harvest---think i'm gonna use this to flush last couple waterings prior to harvest---also been adding it to the aerocloner---got me 100% rooted clones


Last edited Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:31 am | Scroll up

#10

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:14 am
by LEFTHAND | 111 Posts | 418 Points

I will have to say this was the best "additive" used during hydro and synth nutes.
LH.

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#11

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Sun Feb 08, 2015 11:57 am
by Cubby | 1.243 Posts | 4716 Points

I have always added HP to my Hydro res to head off many problems including root slime and keeping the medium clean.


BHC #6 7/8
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#12

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Mon Feb 09, 2015 9:28 am
by Timbrrline | 485 Posts | 1782 Points

Thanx orangesunshine. At the end of my first bout w the black moldy crap. I was wondering about the benificial microbes. Should uou reinnocculate after using the peroxide? Or at 3% does the mitocondria survive?

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#13

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Mon Feb 09, 2015 12:44 pm
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

i saw a list of beneficials that do survive---not sure where---i'll look around a bit more

IMO---surely the higher concentrated peroxide is likely to kill a wider variety of microbes---i would re-inoculate depending on close to harvest i was and consider the reason i added it to my soil in the 1st place---maintenance or treating disease

for instance---i would no doubt re-inoculate if used it any time in veg---i would also re-inoculate if i applied it during the 1st 1/2 of flowering---consider re-inoculating in the 2nd 1/2 of flower if the plant looked like it were diseased or possibly a weak root zone---and---likely would not re-inoculate if my plant looked really healthy and i was using the peroxide as a preventative application instead of a treating an ailment

that's just me---surely others will have their own opinion---hope to hear them

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#14

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Mon Feb 09, 2015 2:10 pm
by Timbrrline | 485 Posts | 1782 Points

How about the use of a "zyme" in conjuction w H2O2. Or are the opposite ends.of the same scale.organic vs synthetics?

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#15

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Tue Feb 10, 2015 2:49 pm
by Justa420Friend | 633 Posts | 2284 Points

Full synth hydro here.
Will add to mix for this next grow.
Want to start light, 2 maybe 3 ml/gal (yes?)


Your Experience is like Water
I am like Rockwool

EVERYTHING you SAY or DO, CAN and WILL be used AGAINST YOU in the Law of Karma
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#16

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Tue Feb 10, 2015 6:34 pm
by orangesunshine | 803 Posts | 3182 Points

Quote: Justa420Friend wrote in post #15
Full synth hydro here.
Will add to mix for this next grow.
Want to start light, 2 maybe 3 ml/gal (yes?)


the posts above say 3 : 1---bottle i got 35% HP says 4 : 1 every 3-4 days---thing about additives is you can always add more later but can't take them back after they're added---imo---good practice to start light and push it if you like what you see---keep us posted

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#17

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Tue Feb 10, 2015 6:39 pm
by Timbrrline | 485 Posts | 1782 Points

Thanx @orangesunshine. This has been most helpful. HP can be used w either synthetics. When used as a preventative its concentration is not strong enough to kill all the benificials. I have some pics i took of a recovery using HP i will post later.

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#18

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Tue Feb 10, 2015 6:41 pm
by Timbrrline | 485 Posts | 1782 Points

Dang. Either synthetics or organics....

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#19

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Wed Feb 11, 2015 1:16 am
by ozzydiodude • The Weird One | 2.468 Posts | 11514 Points

I'll have to do some hunting but the way I understand the H2O2 workings on the bacteria, it the number of bacteria that decide which bacteria are killed off the bigger larger colonies of bacteria are killed first then the smaller groups survive and thrive off the remains. when doing a soil true organic grow you actually have the good and bad bacteria and fungus growing in your soil they just keep each other under control. With the DWC the light getting in gives the bad bacteria and fungi the upper hand and the grow faster robbing the plants of nutes and blocking their water uptake


[odd1] Sending GreenMojo Your way
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#20

RE: Liquid Oxygen

in Nutrients Tue Feb 24, 2015 11:50 pm
by Timbrrline | 485 Posts | 1782 Points

Here are some pics of a recovery using H2O2.
I started regrowing the roots at the same time i flipped the light to flower.
I had no place to revel so........


roots rotting off. I cut all these off and treated w 3% H2O2 @ 10 ml/gal for 24 hrs.
tossed solution for fresh.
add rooting juice to reroot plants


7 days. its obvious the plants were already growing new roots.


12 days


21 days. Began to use 3% H2O2 @ 5ml/gal every 3 days.




28 days


as the lights came up.....

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